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GOOD NEWS, bad news

GOOD NEWS, bad news

| March 12, 2024

Take a moment. Look Around. Life is good.  

Weight loss drugs and healthcare technology are turning lives around for the better, and we see it in real time. It’s wonderful.  

Recently, one of our friends and clients experienced a life-changing health improvement through some of this new tech. As a result of such breakthroughs, our collective life expectancy may be extended by several years using reasonable estimates – and those can be quality-added years, too. For my affected friend, their retirement spent alongside loved ones and traveling the world may increase by upwards of 150%! 

This is big stuff. 

That’s potentially 150% more sunsets, and evenings spent reading and relaxing on their schedule. That’s more worry-free weeks and memorable moments to look forward to. Ok, “worry-free” might be hyperbole, but it is undeniable that a little health technology originally intended to combat diabetes can now improve the lives of millions of Americans. 

We have so much to be grateful for. 

Not only are “GLP-1” weight-loss drugs providing significant changes for our quality of life, but Wall Street analysts estimate that economic output and increased efficiency may soon be improved just like how smart robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) are poised to revolutionize the global economy.  

For you personally, though, what if you had another five, ten, or even fifteen years of your life to enjoy, free from pain and physical inhibitions?  

How much more could you do with a handful of HEALTHY years? How much more could you accomplish? How many more family gatherings – birthdays, holidays, graduations, weddings, and summer reunions – could you relish? Would you choose to volunteer or work for a purpose near to your heart? Would you simply live the good life, hitting your top spots with your favorite people?  

Imagine not having to take that drive to the hospital quite as often, not needing to care for friends and family unable to help themselves, and not taking so many sick and personal days at work. The quality-of-life improvement for a nation that so desperately needs it is potentially remarkable. The ensuing five to ten years will surely be exciting to watch unfold. 

As you know, I pay close attention to the financial markets and what’s happening with companies big and small. Multinational junk-food companies are shaking in their wing-tipped shoes. They are worried about significant hits to demand for sugary snacks and salty delights they work so hard to sell to you, me, and our kids. While we own shares in some of those companies, I am not so worried about them. 

Rather, I’m excited for the rest of us! 

My own family has faced some health struggles, and we have benefited greatly from recent med-tech innovations. Our extended family unit won't always be intact, but currently, we are, thanks to the science and hard work of our fellow human beings who strive to help people they will never meet. Thank you. 

Today, hundreds of thousands of people in mid-life aren't dying, all thanks to improved cardiac care, as they regularly were in the 1980s. This healthcare progress feels like it might be a similar or even bigger innovation. But it's hard to see, as people not dying isn't exactly noticeable, yet it is certainly a welcome change. 

As for the markets and your portfolio, that recession so many pundits on TV feared never materialized. The stock market is doing well, especially considering everything that’s going on in the world. While there are plenty of ongoing catastrophes occurring beyond our borders, and I do not mean to belittle them, there really are life-improving tailwinds front and center in 2024. But so often, when looking at what's wrong in the world, it's easy to forget all that’s going right. 

Balance is important. Whenever you find yourself getting pulled into the bad news camp, look for the positivity taking place - like in healthcare tech today.

There is good news out there if you look hard enough for it. 

Thanks for taking a look! 

Tom